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Contribution of the dorsal subiculum to memory for temporal order and novelty detection using objects, odors, or spatial locations in the rat.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Neurobiol Learn Mem, Volume 93, Issue 3, p.330-6 (2010)

Keywords:

Animals, Exploratory Behavior, Hippocampus, Locomotion, Male, Memory, Odors, Random Allocation, Rats, Rats, Long-Evans, Signal Detection, Psychological, Space Perception, Time Perception

Abstract:

<p>The contribution of the dorsal subiculum (DS) to memory for temporal order and novelty detection was assessed using a spontaneous exploration paradigm with objects (visual/tactile stimuli), odors, or spatial locations (Hunsaker, Fieldsted, Rosenberg, & Kesner, 2008). Rats with selective excitotoxic lesions of the DS were compared to sham-operated rats (SHAM) in the two exploration tests. In temporal order tests, two previously explored stimuli were presented and normal rats typically show a preference for exploring the stimulus that was first explored compared to the other stimulus. In novelty detection tests, a familiar and a new stimulus were presented and normal rats typically have a preference for exploring new stimuli. In temporal order tests, results indicated that Group SHAM explored significantly more the first than the last stimulus they met when the stimuli were odors or objects. In addition, SHAM rats predictably displayed a significant preference for the new stimulus in the novelty detection tests with objects, odors, and spatial locations. Group DS did not differ from controls on the temporal order and the novelty detection tests with objects or odors. However, on the novelty detection test with spatial locations, Group DS differed from Group SHAM. These results suggest that the DS is necessary for the memory of spatial locations but not of objects and odors.</p>

Funding / Support / Partners

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